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Psychiatry Electronic Modules

Description

Our team aims to create and disseminate easy-to-follow and highly accessible electronic learning modules about two clinically under-recognized psychiatric disorders associated with a high risk of suicide: Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Eating Disorders. The education will target early-in-training medical learners, focusing on these particular diagnoses with high suicide risk in order to better prepare them to recognize and treat such disorders. We intend to bridge curricular gaps by providing learning to students who might not otherwise see these particular diagnoses during their clinical rotations.

Strategic Alignment with National Suicide Prevention Goals

CDC Suicide Prevention Strategies

As it is outlined in the CDC's "Preventing Suicide: A Technical Package of Policy, Programs, and Practices," our project is aligned with the following strategies:

    • Strengthen Access and Delivery of Suicide Care

    • Identify and Support People at Risk

White House Priorities

As it is outlined in The White House "Fact Sheet: New Strategy Outlines Five Priorities for Reducing Military and Veteran Suicide," our project is aligned with the following priorities:

    • Increasing Access to and Delivery of Effective Care

    • Addressing Upstream Risk and Protective Factors

Selected References

  1. Crow SJ, Peterson CB, Swanson SA, et al. Increased Mortality in Bulimia Nervosa and Other Eating Disorders. Am J Psychiat. 2009;166(12):1342-1346. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2009.09020247
  2. Hoang U, Goldacre M, James A. Mortality following hospital discharge with a diagnosis of eating disorder: National record linkage study, England, 2001–2009. Int J Eat Disorder. 2014;47(5):507-515. doi:10.1002/eat.22249
  3. Phillips KA, Menard W. Suicidality in body dysmorphic disorder: a prospective study. Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Jul;163(7):1280-2. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.163.7.1280. PMID: 16816236; PMCID: PMC1899233.
  4. Phillips KA. Suicidality in Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Prim psychiatry. 2007 Dec;14(12):58-66. PMID: 18449358; PMCID: PMC2361388.