Resources Within ‘Disasters’

Restoring a Sense of Safety in the Aftermath of a Mass Shooting: Tips for Parents and Professionals

Too often our children are exposed to violence that is both senseless and harmful. Many children, those living in close proximity to a tragic event, and those who will learn

Terrorism and Disaster: Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

Continuing Medical Education series created through Uniformed Services University and RUSH Medical School collaboration.

Terrorism and Disaster: Pneuomic Plague

Continuing Medical Education series created through Uniformed Services University and RUSH Medical School collaboration.

Terrorism and Disaster: Sarin

Continuing Medical Education series created through Uniformed Services University and RUSH Medical School collaboration.

Terrorism and Disaster: Staphyloccocal Enterotoxin B

Continuing Medical Education series created through Uniformed Services University and RUSH Medical School collaboration.

Terrorism and Disaster: Emergency Mental Health After A Suicide Bombing

Continuing Medical Education series created through Uniformed Services University and RUSH Medical School collaboration.

Terrorism and Disaster: Psychiatric Sequelae of a 9/11 Survivor

Continuing Medical Education series created through Uniformed Services University and RUSH Medical School collaboration.

Addressing the Needs of the Seriously Mentally Ill in Disaster

In the acute stages of a disaster, those with serious mental illness may function relatively well. Like the rest of the population, they often “rise to the occasion” to assist

Psychological First Aid

People often experience strong and unpleasant emotional and physical responses to disasters. Reactions may include combinations of confusion, fear, hopelessness, helplessness, sleeplessness, physical pain, anxiety, anger, grief, shock, aggressiveness, mistrustfulness,

Psychological First Aid (Chinese)

This is the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress resource “Psychological First Aid” Chinese translation.

Mental Health and Behavioral Guidelines for Response to a Pandemic Flu Outbreak

It is only relatively recently that attention has been focused on the mental health impact of disasters. Previously, concerns related to immediate physical health and community infrastructure risks in the

Leadership and Supervision for Body Recovery in Mass Death

When the magnitude of death and destruction from an event is severe, many different groups of workers are involved and often work in isolation from each other. Some will undergo

Leadership in the Wake of Disaster

This document is a selection of excerpts from an excellent article about leadership in the wake of disaster, by Prudence Bushnell, the US Ambassador to Kenya in 1998. The author’s

Japan Disaster: Overview for American Military Leaders

The earthquake, tsunami and ongoing radiation event at the nuclear power plant in Japan have resulted in significant human tragedy and distress. Over 10,000 people have died, hundreds of thousands

Principles of Psychological First Aid (Japanese)

Resource features the Five Principles of Psychological First Aid by Hobfoll et al translated to Japanese.

Initial Primary Care Screening for Severe Psychiatric Illness

Most reactions experienced by displaced individuals in the aftermath of disasters will be transient or respond to brief supportive interventions. However, primary care providers conducting initial assessments should remain vigilant

Sustaining Caregiving and Psychological Well-Being While Caring for Disaster Victims

The magnitude of death and destruction in disasters and the often difficult nature of the medical response require special attention to the needs of health care providers. Supporting caregivers and

Hazardous Materials Cleanup and Continous Operations

Hazardous materials recovery teams can perform for long periods of time with the right support. Civilian and military personnel have long been expected to operate at an acceptable level of

Guidelines on Notifying Families of Dead or Missing Loved Ones

This document is written for leaders, health care providers, and disaster workers who assist local and national authorities following natural disasters, terrorist actions, or other events that result in large

Protecting Your Health and the Health of Your Family: H1N1 Influenza Guidelines

It is important to protect your health and the health of your family for risk of H1N1 influenza (referred to as “swine flu” early on). This virus is spreading from

Debriefing Debate

The magnitude of death and destruction in disasters and the extent of the response demand special attention. Physical safety and security of victims and relief workers must take first priority.

Business Leadership in Bioterrorism Preparedness

The workplace has been the primary target of terrorism in the United States. The events of 9/11, the anthrax attacks of 2001, the Oklahoma City bombing, and the 1993 World

Body Recovery and Stress Management for Leaders and Supervisors

The magnitude of death and destruction in this event require special measures to manage body recovery. Physical safety and security of body handlers takes priority over providing psychological counseling. Supervision

Information for Relief Workers on Emotional Reactions to Human Bodies in Mass Death

In your work with this disaster you are likely to see, smell, and handle the dead bodies of men women and children of all ages. Working with or around human

Media Management in Body Recovery from Mass Death

The media are often the major means of communication about disasters. Accurate information about such events is critical for the public perception of what has transpired and likely next steps.

Information for Healthcare Providers in Body Recovery from Mass Death

As a healthcare provider at the site of mass death you may be supervising a team of workers recovering bodies or you may be working directly with human remains. Working

Recovery in the Aftermath of Workplace Violence: Guidance for Workers

Returning to work routines following any violent incident at the workplace can be very challenging. Even after the work area is secured, and victims or perpetrators are no longer present,

Recovery in the Aftermath of Workplace Violence: Guidance for Supervisors

Supervisors face particular challenges following any violent incident in the work setting. Even after the work area is secured, and victims or perpetrators are no longer present, emotional reactions and

Courage to Care: Public Health Emergencies (Family)

Public health emergencies, such as the swine flu epidemic, create a call to action for individuals and families to take responsibility for their health. The public is a key partner

Courage to Care: Psychological First Aid

As a healthcare provider, first responder, leader or manager of disaster operations, this fact sheet describes an evidenced-based approach for helping victims cope in the immediate aftermath of a disaster

Courage to Care: The Health Consequences of Disasters and Evacuation

This installment of Courage to Care is designed to facilitate doctor-patient dialogue around the health implications of exposure to disasters, especially those that require the need for evacuation. The talking

Courage to Care: Fostering Safety, Health, and Preparedness (Archive)

Military medical providers will play an important role this fall as the nation observes the 5th anniversary of 9/11, the anthrax attacks, and the War on Terror. Disaster anniversary events

Courage to Care: Family Planning for Disasters

Major events such as Hurricane Katrina make us think about the impact of such disasters on our family and loved ones, and how prepared we would be. Whether we live